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Floyd Mayweather Jr.

 

floyd_thumb  Floyd Mayweather Jr.

 

Floyd Joy Mayweather, Jr., (born Floyd Sinclair; February 24, 1977) is an American professional boxer.[1] He is a five-division world champion, where he has won eight world titles, as well as the Lineal Championship in three different weight classes.[2] He is a two-time The Ring "Fighter of the Year," winning the award in 1998 and 2007[3] also won the Boxing Writers Association of America (BWAA) "Fighter of the Year" award in 2007 and Best Fighter ESPY Award 2007, 2008, 2010 and 2012.[4][5] He is undefeated as a professional boxer.[6] On June 1, 2012 Mayweather was jailed for domestic violence.[7]

Currently, Mayweather is the WBC Welterweight Champion,[8] WBA (Super) Light Middleweight Champion[9] and recipient of the WBC Diamond belt.[10] He is also rated as the best pound for pound boxer in the world by most sporting news and boxing websites, including Sports Illustrated, ESPN, BoxRec, Fox Sports, Yahoo! Sports and About.com.[11][12][13][14][15][16] Floyd Mayweather topped the Forbes magazine and Sports Illustrated Fortune 50 of the highest-paid athletes of 2012.[17][18]. Floyd is managed by controversial manager Al Haymon.[19]

Amateur career and Olympics

Mayweather had an amateur record of 84–6[23] and won national Golden Gloves championships in 1993 (at 106 lb), 1994 (at 114 lb) and 1996 (at 125 lb).[24] He was given the nickname "Pretty Boy" by his amateur teammates because he had relatively few scars, a result of the defensive techniques that his father (Floyd Mayweather, Sr.) and uncle (Roger Mayweather) had taught him.[25] In his orthodox defensive stance, Mayweather often utilizes the 'shoulder roll'. The shoulder roll is an old-school boxing technique in which the right hand is held normally or slightly higher than normal, the left hand is down around the midsection and the lead shoulder is raised high on the cheek in order to cover the chin and block punches. The right hand (from orthodox stance) is used as it normally would be to block punches coming from the other side, such as left hooks. From this stance, Mayweather blocks, slips and deflects most of his opponents' punches, even when cornered, by twisting left and right to the rhythm of their punches.[26]

At the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta, Mayweather won a bronze medal by reaching the semi-finals of the featherweight (57 kg)[27] division.

In the opening round, Mayweather led 10–1 on points over Bakhtiyar Tileganov of Kazakhstan before he won in Round 2 by referee stoppage. In the second round, Mayweather outpointed Artur Gevorgyan of Armenia 16–3. In the quarterfinals, the 19-year-old Mayweather, narrowly defeated the 22-year-old Lorenzo Aragon of Cuba in an all-action bout to win 12–11, becoming the first U.S boxer to defeat a Cuban in 20 years.[28] The last time this had occurred was at 1976 Summer Olympics when the U.S Olympic boxing team captured five gold medals, among its recipients was boxing great Sugar Ray Leonard. In his semifinal bout against the eventual silver medalist, Serafim Todorov of Bulgaria, Mayweather lost by a controversial decision, similarly to the Roy Jones Jr.'s decision.[29] Referee, Hamad Hafaz Shouman of Egypt, mistakenly raised Mayweather's hand, thinking he had won, as the decision was announced giving the bout to the Bulgarian.[30]

The U.S team filed a protest over the Mayweather bout, claiming the judges were intimidated by Bulgaria's Emil Jetchev, head of the boxing officials, into favoring Bulgarian Serafim Todorov by a 10–9 decision in the 125-pound semifinal bout. Three of Jetchev's countrymen were in gold medal bouts. Judge Bill Waeckerle, one of the four U.S judges working the games for the International Amateur Boxing Federation, quit both as an Olympic judge and as a federation judge after Mayweather lost a decision loudly booed by the crowd at the Alexander Memorial Coliseum.[31][32]

"I refuse to be part of an organisation that continues to conduct its officiating in this manner," Waeckerle wrote in a letter of resignation to federation President Anwar Chowdhry.[33]

In the official protest, U.S team manager Gerald Smith said Mayweather landed punches that were not counted, while Todorov was given points without landing a punch.[34] "The judging was totally incompetent," Waeckerle said. The judges failed to impose a mandatory two-point deduction against Todorov after he was warned five times by the referee for slapping.[30]

"Everybody knows Floyd Mayweather is the gold-medal favorite at 57 kilograms," Mayweather said afterward. "In America, it's known as 125 pounds. You know and I know I wasn't getting hit. They say he's the world champion. Now you all know who the real world champion is."[34]

Qualification as a Featherweight for the United States Olympic Team.

    • Defeated William Jenkins RSC/TKO-3
    • Defeated James Baker RSCH/TKO-1
    • Lost to Augie SanchezPTS (11–12)
    • Defeated Carlos Navarro PTS (31–11)
    • Defeated Augie SanchezPTS (12–8) at the Box-offs
    • Defeated Augie Sanchez PTS (20–10) at the Box-offs

Olympic Results

Controversial decision was officially protested (unsuccessfully) by the U.S. team.

Professional career

Super Featherweight

Mayweather fought his first professional bout on October 11, 1996 against fellow newcomer Roberto Apodaca, who was knocked out in round two. Mayweather's trainer at the time was his uncle, Roger Mayweather, because Floyd Mayweather, Sr. was still imprisoned after having been convicted of illegal drug trafficking in 1993. Mayweather, Sr. took over as Mayweather, Jr.'s trainer when he was released from prison (after Mayweather, Jr.'s fourteenth fight—a second-round knockout of Sam Girard).[35] From 1996 to early 1998, Mayweather won most of his fights by knockout or TKO.

Early in his pro-career, Mayweather received praise from all corners of the boxing world and was touted as a prodigal pugilist.[36]

During Floyd Mayweather vs. Tony Duran,[37] the ESPN commentator remarked, "(IBHOF & WBHF trainer) Emmanuel Steward was quoted as saying, there have been very few who have been more talented than this kid [Mayweather], he will probably win two or three world championships, I think he will go on to be the best ever."[38]

The IBHOF trainer and commentator, Gil Clancy, commented before Floyd Mayweather engaged in his 9th professional fight against Jesus Chavez, boldly declaring, "I thought that Floyd Mayweather was the outstanding pro prospect in the entire Olympic games."[39]

Professional boxing record

43 Wins (26 knockouts, 17 decisions), 0 Losses, 0 Draws[148]
Res. Record Opponent Type Rd., Time Date Location Notes
Win 43–0 Puerto Rico Miguel Cotto UD 12 2012-05-05 United States MGM Grand Garden Arena, Las Vegas, Nevada Won WBA (Super) Light Middleweight title.
Awarded WBC Diamond Light Middleweight title.
Win 42–0 United States Victor Ortiz KO 4 (12), 2:59 2011-09-17 United States MGM Grand Garden Arena, Las Vegas, Nevada Won WBC Welterweight title.
Win 41–0 United States Shane Mosley UD 12 2010-05-01 United States MGM Grand Garden Arena, Las Vegas, Nevada A non-title welterweight bout.
Win 40–0 Mexico Juan Manuel Márquez UD 12 2009-09-19 United States MGM Grand Garden Arena, Las Vegas, Nevada A non-title welterweight bout. Fight at 142-pound catch weight.
Win 39–0 United Kingdom Ricky Hatton TKO 10 (12), 1:35 2007-12-08 United States MGM Grand Garden Arena, Las Vegas, Nevada Retained WBC & The Ring Welterweight titles.
Win 38–0 United States Oscar De La Hoya SD 12 2007-05-05 United States MGM Grand Garden Arena, Las Vegas, Nevada Won WBC Light Middleweight title.
Win 37–0 Argentina Carlos Baldomir UD 12 2006-11-04 United States Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino, Las Vegas, Nevada Retained IBO and won WBC, IBA & The Ring Welterweight titles.
Win 36–0 United States Zab Judah UD 12 2006-04-08 United States Thomas & Mack Center, Las Vegas, Nevada Won IBF & vacant IBO Welterweight titles.
Win 35–0 United States Sharmba Mitchell TKO 6 (12), 2:06 2005-11-19 United States Rose Garden, Portland, Oregon A non-title welterweight bout.
Win 34–0 Canada Arturo Gatti RTD 6 (12), 3:00 2005-06-25 United States Boardwalk Hall, Atlantic City, New Jersey Won WBC Light Welterweight title.
Win 33–0 Puerto Rico Henry Bruseles TKO 8 (12), 2:55 2005-01-22 United States American Airlines Arena, Miami, Florida WBC Light Welterweight Title Eliminator.
Win 32–0 United States DeMarcus Corley UD 12 2004-05-22 United States Boardwalk Hall, Atlantic City, New Jersey WBC Light Welterweight Title Eliminator.
Win 31–0 South Africa Phillip N'dou TKO 7 (12), 1:08 2003-11-01 United States Van Andel Arena, Grand Rapids, Michigan Retained WBC & The Ring Lightweight titles.
Win 30–0 Dominican Republic Victoriano Sosa UD 12 2003-04-19 United States Selland Arena, Fresno, California Retained WBC & The Ring Lightweight titles.
Win 29–0 Mexico José Luis Castillo UD 12 2002-12-07 United States Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino, Las Vegas, Nevada Retained WBC & The Ring Lightweight titles.
Win 28–0 Mexico José Luis Castillo UD 12 2002-04-20 United States MGM Grand Garden Arena, Las Vegas, Nevada Won WBC & vacant The Ring Lightweight titles.
Win 27–0 Mexico Jesús Chávez RTD 9 (12), 3:00 2001-11-10 United States Bill Graham Civic Auditorium, San Francisco, California Retained Lineal & WBC Super Featherweight titles.
Win 26–0 United States Carlos Hernández UD 12 2001-05-26 United States Van Andel Arena, Grand Rapids, Michigan Retained Lineal & WBC Super Featherweight titles.
Win 25–0 United States Diego Corrales TKO 10 (12), 2:19 2001-01-20 United States MGM Grand Garden Arena, Las Vegas, Nevada Retained Lineal & WBC Super Featherweight titles.
Win 24–0 United States Emanuel Augustus TKO 9 (10), 1:06 2000-10-21 United States Cobo Center, Detroit, Michigan A non-title lightweight bout.
Win 23–0 Mexico Gregorio Vargas UD 12 2000-03-18 United States MGM Grand Garden Arena, Las Vegas, Nevada Retained Lineal & WBC Super Featherweight titles.
Win 22–0 Puerto Rico Carlos Gerena RTD 7 (12), 3:00 1999-09-11 United States Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino, Las Vegas, Nevada Retained Lineal & WBC Super Featherweight titles.
Win 21–0 Uganda Justin Juuko KO 9 (12), 1:20 1999-05-22 United States Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino, Las Vegas, Nevada Retained Lineal & WBC Super Featherweight titles.
Win 20–0 Argentina Carlos Rios UD 12 1999-02-17 United States Van Andel Arena, Grand Rapids, Michigan Retained Lineal & WBC Super Featherweight titles.
Win 19–0 United States Angel Manfredy TKO 2 (12), 2:47 1998-12-19 United States Miccosukee Indian Reservation, Miami, Florida Retained Lineal & WBC Super Featherweight titles.
Win 18–0 United States Genaro Hernández RTD 8 (12), 3:00 1998-10-03 United States Las Vegas Hilton, Las Vegas, Nevada Won Lineal & WBC Super Featherweight titles.
Win 17–0 Canada Tony Pep UD 10 1998-06-14 United States Trump Taj Mahal, Atlantic City, New Jersey
Win 16–0 Argentina Gustavo Cuello UD 10 1998-04-18 United States Grand Olympic Auditorium, Los Angeles, California
Win 15–0 Dominican Republic Miguel Melo TKO 3 (10), 2:30 1998-03-23 United States Foxwoods Resort Casino, Mashantucket, Connecticut
Win 14–0 United States Sam Girard TKO 2 (10), 2:47 1998-02-28 United States Bally's Atlantic City, Atlantic City, New Jersey
Win 13–0 Puerto Rico Hector Arroyo TKO 5 (10), 1:21 1998-01-09 United States Grand Casino Biloxi, Biloxi, Mississippi
Win 12–0 United States Angelo Nuñez TKO 3 (8), 2:42 1997-11-20 United States Grand Olympic Auditorium, Los Angeles, California
Win 11–0 Mexico Felipe Garcia KO 6 (8), 2:56 1997-10-14 United States Qwest Arena, Boise, Idaho
Win 10–0 United States Louie Leija TKO 2 (10), 2:33 1997-09-06 United States El Paso County Coliseum, El Paso, Texas
Win 9–0 Mexico Jesús Chávez TKO 5 (6), 2:02 1997-07-12 United States Grand Casino Biloxi, Biloxi, Mississippi
Win 8–0 United States Larry O'Shields UD 6 1997-06-14 United States Alamodome, San Antonio, Texas
Win 7–0 United States Tony Duran TKO 1 (6), 1:12 1997-05-09 United States Orleans Hotel & Casino, Las Vegas, Nevada
Win 6–0 United States Bobby Giepert KO 1 (6), 1:30 1997-04-12 United States Thomas & Mack Center, Las Vegas, Nevada
Win 5–0 United States Kino Rodriguez TKO 1 (6), 1:44 1997-03-12 United States DeltaPlex Arena, Walker, Michigan
Win 4–0 United States Edgar Ayala TKO 2 (4), 1:39 1997-02-01 United States Swiss Park Hall, Chula Vista, California
Win 3–0 United States Jerry Cooper TKO 1 (4), 1:39 1997-01-18 United States Thomas & Mack Center, Las Vegas, Nevada
Win 2–0 United States Reggie Sanders UD 4 1996-11-30 United States Tingley Coliseum, Albuquerque, New Mexico
Win 1–0 Mexico Roberto Apodaca TKO 2 (4), 0:37 1996-10-11 United States Texas Station, Las Vegas, Nevada Mayweather's professional debut.

 

Titles in boxing

Major World Titles:

Minor World Titles:

The Ring/Lineal Championship Titles:

Special Titles:

 

Honours, awards and recognitions


 

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